Interracial marriage in louisiana

Duration: 12min 46sec Views: 961 Submitted: 06.03.2020
Category: Mature
It affects everyone, young and old. The project is comprised of video interviews of 11 interracial couples, four stories and two photo galleries. Watching all of the videos made me very emotional. Partly because I empathize with struggles and resistance the couples faced.

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Living Interracial in Louisiana - I'm Not the Nanny

In October , Keith Bardwell, a Robert, Louisiana , Justice of the Peace , refused to officiate the civil wedding of an interracial couple because of his personal views, in spite of a United States Supreme Court ruling which prohibited restrictions on interracial marriage as unconstitutional. His action was widely criticized, and many public officials in Louisiana called for his resignation. He resigned on November 3, On October 6, an interracial couple, Beth Humphrey and Terence McKay, inquired of Bardwell, the justice of the peace for the 8th Ward of Louisiana's Tangipahoa Parish , about getting a marriage license signed. His wife Beth Bardwell reportedly told them that the justice "does not do interracial marriages". Justice Bardwell referred the couple to a justice of the peace of a neighboring ward, who performed the wedding.

La. interracial marriage: Is life tougher for biracial kids?

CNN -- A Louisiana justice of the peace who drew criticism for refusing to marry an interracial couple has resigned, the secretary of state's office said Tuesday. Keith Bardwell resigned in person at the Louisiana secretary of state's office, said spokesman Jacques Berry. The state Supreme Court will appoint an interim justice of the peace to fill Bardwell's position, Berry said, and a special election will be held next year to fill the position permanently. Bardwell, a justice of the peace for Tangipahoa Parish's 8th Ward, refused to perform a marriage ceremony for Beth Humphrey, 30, and her boyfriend Terence McKay, 32, both of Hammond, Louisiana, and sign their marriage license.
As the nation becomes more accepting of people marrying someone of another race or ethnicity, a recent study found that the Baton Rouge and Lafayette areas rank among the least likely for newlyweds to be of different backgrounds. A relative lack of diversity in the two Louisiana metro areas may have much to do with the statistics, but some people point to other factors, chief among them attitudes about race. Almost 50 years after the U. Supreme Court declared laws preventing interracial marriages or intimate relationships unconstitutional, the percentage of such newlywed couples in the U.